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Chapter Ii: Related Literature and Studies of Inventory System

Chapter II: Related Literature and Studies Review of Related Literature In exploration, we find new techniques, new knowledge, even develop new substances, gadgets, equipment, processes or procedures, imagination and skill is employed by the researcher. The commodities, new devices, services, in technology are needs of man for a better fuller life which is the concern of the research. These useful arts are the products of the technological environment and the end-user is society in general.

The fast growing trend and innovation in technologies today prompts researchers to conduct studies about the efficiency of system program. This Chapter presents a brief review of literature and studies, both local and foreign that is related to these studies. Review of Related Studies The following statements given are related to our study about the inventory system which is found very useful for the proponents in making the system. It is nearly impossible to overemphasize the importance of keeping inventory levels under control,” Ronald Pachura wrote in an article for IIE Solutions. “Whether the problems incurred are caused by carrying too little or too much inventory, manufacturers need to become aware that inventory control is not just a materials management or warehouse department issue. The purchasing, receiving, engineering, manufacturing, and accounting departments all contribute to the accuracy of the inventory methods and records. It is little wonder that business experts commonly cite inventory management as a vital element that can spell the difference between success and failure in today’s keenly competitive business world. Writing in Production and Inventory Management Journal, Godwin Udo described telecommunications technology as a critical organizational asset that can help a company realize important competitive gains in the area of inventory management.

According to Udo, companies that make good use of this technology are far better equipped to succeed than those who rely on outdated or unwieldy methods of inventory control. Automation can draidatically affect all phases of inventory management, including counting and monitoring of inventory items; recording and retrieval of item storage locations; recording changes to inventory; and anticipating inventory needs, including inventory handling requirements.

This is true even of stand-alone systems that are not integrated with other areas of the business. But many analysts indicate that productivity—and hence profitability—gains that are garnered through use of automated systems can be increased when a business integrates its inventory control systems with other systems, such as accounting and sales, to better manage…

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