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Safety Management

Safety Management … a guide 5th Edition First published February 2000 Revised and reprinted July 2003 NT WorkSafe, Department of Employment, Education and Training Northern Territory Government ISBN 0 7245 2991 8 Contents What it’s all about …………………………………………………………………………………………… 5 Legal obligations ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 5 Safety management systems ………………………………………………………………………….. How you can use this guide ……………………………………………………………………………. 6 Health and safety action plans ………………………………………………………………………… 6 You should use this guide to do a self-assessment …………………………………………. 6 Responsibilities ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 7 Consultation…………………………………………………………………………………………………… Management meetings…………………………………………………………………………………… 8 Safety committees…………………………………………………………………………………………. 8 Informal meetings………………………………………………………………………………………….. 8 Shift meetings ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9 Identify Hazards ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 0 Identify the hazards……………………………………………………………. ……………………….. 10 Assess the risk …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11 Outcome…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11 Likelihood …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 11 Exposure ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 1 Risk assessment table ………………………………………………………………………………….. 13 Control the Risks ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 14 Keep it going ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 15 Information …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 16 Instruction and training…………………………………………………………………………………. 7 Supervision ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 17 Managing injuries …………………………………………………………………………………………. 18 First aid………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 18 Workers compensation …………………………………………………………………………………. 18 Rehabilitation and return to work ………………………………………………………………….. 9 Record keeping…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 20 Monitoring and review…………………………………………………………………………………… 22 How effective are the control measures?………………………………………………………… 22 How effective is the process? ……………………………………………………………………….. 22 How effective is your consultation, information, instruction and training?…………….. 3 Health and safety action plan ………………………………………………………………………… 24 Notification of accidents and occurrences …………………………………………………….. 26 Types of accidents and occurrences………………………………………………………………. 26 Who is required to notify NT WorkSafe…………………………………………………………… 26 Accident report …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7 Why report and investigate accidents …………………………………………………………….. 27 Where to report …………………………………………………………………………………………… 27 Safety Management – a guide… page 3 Resources ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 28 Relevant Australian Standards………………………………………………………………………. 8 AS/NZS 4801 Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems – Specification with guidance for use …………………………………………………………………………………… 28 AS/NZS 4804 Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems – General guidelines on principles, systems and supporting techniques ……………………………. 28 AS/NZS 4360 Risk Management – General guidelines on principles, systems and supporting techniques ………………………………………………………………………………….. 8 AS/NZS 9000 Quality Management and Quality Assurance Standards –-Guidelines for selection and use ……………………………………………………………………………………. 28 AS/NZS 4581: 1999 Management Systems Integration – Guidance to business, government and community organisations ……………………………………………………… 28 AS/NZS 14004: 1996 Environmental Management Systems – Specification with guidance for use………………………………………………………………………………………….. 8 Other publications to assist you in implementing safety management……………. 29 NT WorkSafe > ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 30 Safety Management – a guide… page 4 What it’s all about The Work Health (Occupational Health and Safety) Regulations focus on a comprehensive approach to safety management, the responsibility for which rests with the employer. The objective is to create a safe workplace free from risk, and this guide describes the process.

The role of NT WorkSafe is to provide guidance to employers to assist them to develop a safety management system. This document has been designed to help you check what currently exists in the workplace and suggests how this can be further developed into a more effective safety management system. Good management practices are fundamental to business in today’s competitive environment. The key objective must be to manage business professionally by drawing together the areas of the engineering, safety, quality, risk management, personnel and finance.

None of these can be managed in isolation, it requires an integrated approach. Are the NT Work Health Act and OHS Regulations held at the workplace? Yes No Things to consider: Is your company committed to workplace health and safety? Yes No Criteria • Health and safety reflected in everyday activities and priorities • Health and safety on company agenda • Health and Safety Plan Legal obligations Employers have a ‘duty of care’ to provide a safe workplace and systems of work, to consult with workers and to keep them informed about health and safety matters.

Familiarising yourself with this material is an excellent starting point, but is not intended as a statement of law. Copies of the Work Health Act and the Work Health (Occupational Health and Safety) Regulations are available from Northern Territory Government Printing Office, Railway Street, Parap NT, telephone 8999 4036 or on the NT Government Internet at http://www. nt. gov. au/lant/hansard/hansard. shtml. Safety Management – a guide… page 5 Things to consider Have you contacted NT WorkSafe on completion of your selfassessment? Yes No Safety management systems

Safety management can best be described as a set of actions or procedures relating to health and safety in the workplace, put in place and actively endorsed by management to achieve the following • identification, assessment and control of all workplace hazards and risks • active involvement in health and safety matters with managers, supervisors and workers working together both formally and informally to improve health and safety • providing information and training for people at all levels so they can effectively meet their responsibilities • designing and implementing company goals and objectives about health and safety.

How you can use this guide This guide provides a simple audit tool to assess what safety management processes you have in place compared with the requirements of the Work Health (Occupational Safety) Regulations. Health and safety action plans You can use the action plan on page 16 and 17 to plan who is going to do what and when it is going to be done. You should use this guide to do a selfassessment It also forms the basis of what NT WorkSafe officers will be looking for when they visit your workplace. They will validate your assessment when they visit and provide more detailed advice.

The aim of this self-assessment and subsequent evaluation is to help you, the employer meet your duty of care by actively managing safety in your workplace. Safety Management – a guide… page 6 Regulation 4 – 14 Responsibilities Under the Work Health (OH & S) Regulations the employer has ultimate responsibility to ensure that a safe workplace is maintained. To meet this requirement, employers must ensure that safety management systems are in place and that responsibility has been allocated to managers, supervisors and workers in the organisation. Safety responsibility should be part of the daily functions of everyone in the workplace.

To ensure that health and safety responsibilities have been assigned the following should be put in place • incorporate health and safety responsibilities into job descriptions for all workers and encourage workers to identify unsafe work situations • responsibilities and accountabilities should be assigned for such things as induction training, first aid, emergency procedures and workplace inspections • ensure that all workers fully understand their responsibilities for health and safety—this can be achieved by using induction and adequate education and training programs.

Things to consider Have you assigned health and safety responsibilities? Yes No Criteria • Built into job descriptions • People at all levels fully understand their responsibilities • Managers and supervisors health and safety performance assessed Do you ensure contractors understand their duty of care? Yes How? No “…making sure things happen” Safety Management – a guide… page 7 Regulation 44 Things to consider Do workers have the opportunity to raise health and safety issues? Yes No Consultation

A very important part of any safety management system is the consultation process between the employer and workers. It can be extremely useful for employers to talk things over with their workers, seek and listen to their advice and ask them for information. Safety management systems work best if everyone, including management and workers, are actively involved in their development and implementation. Effective consultation can be achieved in many ways and you should choose the style that best suits your business. Some typical examples areas follows. Criteria All risks to the health and safety of workers and others are considered and prioritised. • Accidents, incidents and near misses are taken into consideration. How do you act on health and safety issues raised? Management meetings Effective health and safety systems rely on good management, therefore safety should be on the agenda for management meetings and appropriate action taken at these meetings. Safety committees These are a structured style of safety meeting where representative members meet on a regular basis to discuss and recommend actions on safety.

More detailed information can be found in NT WorkSafe’s Consultation bulletin and A Guide to Health and Safety Committees. Informal meetings Informal meetings are short meetings held in the workplace when the need arises, where items of health and safety can be discussed. These can be used to give a brief explanation of how to use a new piece of equipment, or to show an appropriate safety video. Details “Teamwork, cooperation and mutual trust Safety Management – a guide… page 8 Shift meetings These are a very important form of consultation where changes of shift are involved.

Safety issues should be included as a routine item for the brief handover meetings between staff starting and finishing shifts. Safety Management – a guide… page 9 Regulation 38 Things to consider Is there hazard identification process in place? Yes No Identify Hazards An employer must ensure that appropriate measures are taken to identify the hazards and assess the risk to the health and safety of every person in the workplace. Details Are workers encouraged to report hazards or procedure faults? Identify the hazards A hazard is something with the potential to cause harm.

Some examples are trip hazards in a corridor, glare from visual display units (VDUs) and using chemicals incorrectly. There are a number of ways in which hazards can be identified in the workplace, some of these are listed below • a walk-through survey compiling a hazards list as you go • check accidents, near misses and workers compensation records How Does the process include all areas, processes, tasks, occupations, plant and machinery? Consider • Is all plant requiring registration with NT WorkSafe • Identified? • Registered? • Inspected? • talk to workers, e. g. afety committee meetings, informal meetings • look at how work is done, including manual handling practices such as lifting, pushing, pulling • liaise with others in similar industry • contact NT WorkSafe for assistance. Photographing workplace hazards is extremely useful, not only for recording history but also when highlighting issues through discussion at health and safety committee meetings. Note: NT WorkSafe has a number of checklists which may assist you in identifying hazards “Finding the problems before they find you” Safety Management – a guide… page 10 Regulation 38

Assess the risk A risk is the likelihood of a hazard actually causing harm. Risks associated with an identified hazard need to be assessed to determine how severe or dangerous they are. Assessing the risks allows you to make decisions as to what hazards or risks need to be controlled and to set priorities for introducing controls. When assessing the risk you need to take into account any controls that are already in place. Two important laws of human nature should always be taken into account. First, never rely solely on common sense, as it is much less common than is generally assumed.

Second, always rely on Sod’s Law – ‘if someone can do it, sooner or later someone will’. To determine the level or severity of risk you need to consider all of the following. Outcome For each hazard identified, ask the question ‘What if? ’. Realistically, what is the worst likely outcome from exposure to the hazard, . e. g. fatality, major injury, minor injury, no injury. Likelihood What is the likelihood of harm occurring if a person is exposed to the hazard? This could range from inevitable through to unlikely. Exposure How many people are exposed to the hazard and for how long?

This needs to be considered when setting priorities for introducing controls. Things to consider Are risks assessed following the hazard identification exercise? Yes No Are risks to others considered, eg nearby workplaces, the public? Yes No How? Are records of assessment maintained? Yes 5 yrs No 30 yrs Details “How likely is it to happen” Safety Management – a guide… page 11 Things to consider When did you last review your risk assessments? Date: Are risk assessments available to workers? Yes No There are a number of different ways to assess risks.

As a starting point you can use the following simple chart to help you assess the risks in your workplace and prioritise the necessary actions. Some of the key points about assessing the risk in your workplace are as follows. • Assessment must cover all the risks to the health and safety of people in the workplace. • Assessment must cover risks to non-workers who may be affected by what the employer does such as sub-contractors, the public. • Before new or changed work practices, substances or plant are introduced, the employer must review the original assessment.

A regular review is advised as part of good management practice. • Where groups of workers are especially at risk, they must be identified as part of the assessment, e. g. young, inexperienced or workers with a disability. • Employers must carry out an assessment of first-aid requirements in their workplace and ensure that appropriate equipment, facilities and trained personnel are available and readily accessible in the workplace. A risk assessment enables you to plan, introduce and monitor measures to ensure that risks are adequately controlled at the time.

Events or situations assessed as very likely with fatal consequences are the most serious—high risk. Those assessed as highly unlikely with negligible injuries are the least serious—low risk. Note the risk rating for each hazard you have identified. When you are developing risk-control strategies, you should tackle anything with a high rating first. Have you considered health surveillance for workers exposed to hazardous substances? Yes No If yes, are procedures in place to ensure records are maintained for 30 years? Yes No Safety Management – a guide… page 12 Risk assessment table

Likelihood Consequence Fatality Major injuries Minor injuries Negligible injuries Very Likely High High High Medium Likely High High Medium Medium Unlikely High Medium Medium Low Highly unlikely Medium Medium Low Low Safety Management – a guide… page 13 Regulation 39 Things to consider Have you identified and developed appropriate controls for each risk? Yes No Control the Risks Where an unacceptable risk to health and safety has been identified, control must be introduced to reduce the risk to an acceptable level. There are a number of ways of controlling risks in the workplace.

These are known as the “Hierarchy of Controls”. Placed in order of effectiveness they are as follows. • Eliminate the hazard For example, remove trip hazards in a crowded corridor. Dispose of unwanted chemicals. • Substitute with something of a lesser risk For example, in manual handling, use smaller packages. Use a less toxic chemical. No Do you use the hierarchy of controls? Yes No Are workers involved in developing control measures? Yes How? Comments • Isolate the hazard For example, with isolation, store chemicals in a locked enclosure. Use anti-glare screens on VDUs.

Use trolleys to move heavy loads. • Use administrative controls For example, provide training and adequate instruction on work practices. Provide adequate supervision. Ensure regular maintenance of plant and equipment. Limit exposure time by implementing staff rotation. • Personal protective equipment For example, hearing and eye protection, hard hats, gloves to be provided and worn. Controls should be selected from as high up the list as is practical for maximum effectiveness. In many cases, a combination of the above will be necessary to reduce the level of risk.

Worker involvement is essential to the decision-making process for implementing risk control. “Preventing accidents from happening” Safety Management – a guide… page 14 Keep it going Hazard identification, risk assessment and control are not one-off tasks. The process is ongoing – a system must include regular reviews of safety and the systems of work. In deciding how frequently to carry out such reviews, consider things such as the level of risk—high-risk hazards need more frequent assessments—and the type of hazard involved. Risk assessments must also be done whenever circumstances change, i. e. hen: • information is obtained about a previously unknown design or manufacturing fault or about a previously unidentified hazard • there is a change to a risk control measure after a review of its effectiveness • the system of work is changed • plant or equipment is moved or changes ownership • there is a change to the workplace environment • there is any other change that requires reassessment of an existing risk. Things to consider Do you review the identify, assess, control assessments that have been done previously? Yes No Safety Management – a guide… page 15 Regulation 43 Things to consider

How do you provide health and safety information to workers? Information The Identify, Assess and Control process will establish what health and safety information needs to be communicated to workers. This information should then be distributed in appropriate ways. Information that should be communicated to workers includes the following. • The nature of the hazards and risks Workers must be given adequate information on the hazards and risks they encounter on a daily basis. This it to ensure that they can take appropriate action to ensure their safety at work and the safety of others.

This information can come in many forms ranging from material safety data sheets for chemicals, to product information and equipment operating instructions. • Emergency procedures Workers must be adequately instructed in appropriate emergency procedures relevant to their workplace to ensure their safety. All workplaces will need some form of emergency procedure information, such as fire drills, emergency evacuation procedures, steps to take if a worker is injured. • Work procedures All workers must be given adequate information so they can work safely.

Safe working procedures need to be developed and communicated to all workers. Often incorrect assumptions are made about work procedures, which can result in accidents. Work procedures need to be documented, regularly reviewed and, where required, updated to ensure accuracy. Consider • Procedure manuals • Maintenance manuals • Work instructions • Material safety data sheets • Safety noticeboard • Education sessions • Safety committee Are licence/certification requirements identified? Yes No “Everyone knows what to do and how to do it” Safety Management – a guide… page 16 Instruction and training

Instruction and training plays an important role in ensuring that safe systems of work are effectively achieved and maintained. Some examples of instruction and training that may be required in your workplace are • induction programs for new or relocated workers • refresher courses to keep workers up to date • workers trained to use plant and equipment and have appropriate licences where required • first-aid training. When there are required changes in the workplace, retraining may be required. Things to consider Do you provide workers with necessary instruction, training and supervision to enable them to carry out their work safely?

Yes No Criteria • Induction training for new employees • Clear decisions made as to degree of supervision required for individual workers based on their knowledge and experience • Tasks analysed to identify specific health and safety hazards and associated training needs • Workers are adequately trained in safe work practices including the safe use of plant, equipment, protective clothing, etc • Training content and language is understood by employees • Training provided by persons with appropriate knowledge and skill Supervision Adequate supervision is an integral part of ensuring a safe working environment.

In determining the level of supervision required, the level of instruction and training provided to workers, together with their knowledge and experience, needs to be considered. In providing information, instruction and training, you must take into account the literacy level of workers form non-English-speaking backgrounds. Safety Management – a guide… page 17 Regulation 52 Things to consider Do you have a copy of the NT WorkSafe “Guide to First Aid”? Yes No Managing injuries Work Health legislation requires that injured workers have access to first aid, fair workers compensation and return to work rehabilitation.

Therefore, managing injuries is an integral part of a safety management system. Have you carried out a firstaid assessment? Yes No Does an identified staff member process claims within time limits? Yes No First aid Employers must carry out an assessment of first-aid requirements in their workplace and ensure that appropriate equipment, facilities and trained personnel are available and readily accessible in the workplace. Is information on workers compensation and rehabilitation provided to injured workers? Yes No Is support for rehabilitation and return to work contained within the OHS policy or in a separate policy?

Yes No Workers compensation Your workers compensation claims record is one measure of the success of your safety management program. Employers are required to have a current insurance policy for their PAYE workers. Employers should advise non-PAYE and PPS taxpayers, contractors etc, that they are not covered and they should consider taking out their own insurance. This could be included in their induction program. “An important part of any Safety Management System is managing injuries that occur” Safety Management – a guide… page 18 Rehabilitation and return to work

Rehabilitation can include medical treatment, which reduces the effects of any injury. Occupational or vocational rehabilitation assists the worker to return to the workplace. Employers should assist in rehabilitation and return to work programs for their workers. Employers are key players in successful return to work programs. Good rehabilitation involves commitment and consultation. By being actively involved and taking control, you can reduce claim costs—and ultimately premium costs— and have a positive effect on morale in your workplace. Further information is available in NT WorkSafe bulletins and brochures.

Things to consider Does a senior staff member liaise with the injured worker, insurer and doctor, following a workplace injury and coordinate a documented return to work plan? Yes No Does the organisation maintain regular contact with injured workers? Yes No Safety Management – a guide… page 19 Regulation 38, 45 Things to consider Do you maintain records? Yes No Record keeping Record keeping is an important tool for employers to monitor the performance of their safety management systems. This need not be a complicated task and in some cases, a simple diary of events, procedure, instructions or the like, may be all that is needed.

Records must be kept as evidence that you are complying with legislation. However, many other benefits can be achieved from good record keeping, as outlined briefly below. • Identification, assessment and control Records are your evidence that you have met your legislative responsibilities and builds a history, which helps with continual improvement. • Maintenance and inspection Records for plant and equipment enable you to program future maintenance and can improve the resale value by providing a complete history. • Accident investigation Records can be used as a source for identifying hazards and preventing accidents.

These should also include records of near misses, as these are often a clue to a future, preventable accident. Do you keep personnel records, which include experience, training, health monitoring etc? Yes No Do you have operating instruction and maintenance records for all plant and equipment? Yes No Accident investigation records? Yes No Hazardous substances register? Yes No “Documenting what has been happening to improve future planning” Safety Management – a guide… page 20 • A Hazardous Substance Register is a collection of material safety data heets (MSDS) for all chemicals used at the workplace and is an accessible source of information for workers. Remember, if there is no MSDS, the chemical should not be used. If you store or handle dangerous goods you may also need to keep records relating to these activities. • Comprehensive personnel records e. g. experience, qualifications, training, enable you to ensure personnel are suitable for a particular task make best use of your staff identify training needs which helps to obtain best values for money recruit the most appropriate staff for company needs.

Safety Management – a guide… page 21 Regulation 43 Things to consider How do you provide health and safety information to workers? Yes No Monitoring and review Monitoring and review of the various components of the safety management system must be carried out to see how effective they are. This would include the following. How effective are the control measures? All control measures have to be assessed in order to determine • whether or not they have had the intended effect • that no hazards have been created by the control Consider Information • Instruction • Training • Identify Assess Control process • Consultation When? Do you regularly review the plant and equipment inspection, servicing and maintenance program? Yes No measures. Risk control measures must also be maintained, e. g. work procedures have to be monitored to ensure they are being followed, hearing protectors have to be kept clean and checked for damage. How effective is the process? Consider • Ventilation systems • Forklifts • Vehicles • Cranes • Lifts • Pressure vessels • Trolleys The process itself should be assessed to ensure it is effectively managing the risks.

For example, a control measure may have failed because not all hazards were identified, or because the likelihood of a risk was wrongly assessed. If this is the case, it may be necessary to change the way the system is implemented in your workplace. • Lighting “Everyone knows what to do and how to do it” Safety Management – a guide… page 22 How effective is your consultation, information, instruction and training? Assessment of consultation mechanisms would include whether safety committees are operating effectively and if workers are really involved in the process of safety.

When considering information, instruction and training you would look at how up to date and relevant they are. Also consider whether the information is reaching all that need it, e. g. new workers, non-English speakers. Safety Management – a guide… page 23 Appendix A Health and safety action plan Company name Coordinator What is to be established and implemented Responsibilities • Policy • Job descriptions • Accountability Consultation • Health and safety committees • Meetings • Memos Identify hazards • Identification method • All processes • Frequency Assess risks • Initial • Reassessment Date Responsibilities— allocated to whom?

Target date for completion Review date Safety Management – a guide… page 24 What is to be established and implemented Control risks • Control hierarchy • Review effectiveness Information, instruction and training • Relevant OHS information • Induction training • Initial training • Refresher training Managing injuries • First-aid assessment • Injury reporting method • Compensation process • Rehabilitation process Record keeping • Availability • Electronic back-up • Archives and retrieval Review/improvement • Audits • Implement improvements

Responsibilities— allocated to whom? Target date for completion Review date Safety Management – a guide… page 25 Appendix B Notification of accidents and occurrences Regulation 46 of the Work Health (Occupational Health and Safety) Regulations requires certain types of accidents and occurrences to be reported to NT WorkSafe. It sets out who should notify NT WorkSafe, when to notify and the information required.

The regulation also requires that a written report on the accident be forwarded to NT WorkSafe within seven days. Accidents and occurrences at a workplace of the types listed below must be notified to NT Work Safe as soon a possible after the accident occurs. This is separate from, required in addition to submitting a workers compensation claim. Types of accidents and occurrences Causing the death of a person Causing or, n the basis of medical advice, appears likely to cause a worker to be absent from work for five or more working days Where a worker receives an electrical shock Where a worker is injured and admitted to hospital as an inpatient following exposure to a hazardous substance Where a person, other than a worker, is injured as a result of a workplace activity or a designed plant Involving the collapse, overturning or failure of a load-bearing part of a lift, crane, hoist, lifting gear or scaffolding Involving the failure of pressure equipment Involving the collapse of shoring or an excavation which is more than 1. metres deep Involving the unplanned collapse of a building or structure or part of a building structure Involving an explosion or fire that results in designated plant being inoperative, or normal work being suspended for more than 24 hours Involving an unplanned contact between plant and a live electrical conductor Involving a malfunction or failure of personal protective equipment which affects the health and safety of a person

Who is required to notify NT WorkSafe The employer The employer The employer The occupier of the workplace The employer The occupier of the workplace The owner The employer The occupier of the workplace The occupier of the workplace The employer The employer Safety Management – a guide… page 26 Accident report An accident report must also be completed by the employer, occupier or owner,as appropriate—see above table—and forwarded to NT WorkSafe within seven days of the accident.

The accident report must contain the following information. • the full name and work address of the person giving the notice • the date, time and place of the accident or occurrence • the name, date of birth and occupation of all people who were killed or injured • the work being undertaken by the people who were killed or injured • the cause, nature and extent of injuries sustained by the people who were injured • a brief description of the circumstance of the accident or occurrence and the amage, if any, to the plant • the name of witnesses to the accident or occurrence • details of action taken, or proposed to be taken, to prevent a similar accident or occurrence. Why report and investigate accidents Reporting the accidents gives NT WorkSafe the opportunity to undertake its own investigation. Accidents are investigated to identify the contributing factors so that a further similar accident may be avoided. You should also undertake your own accident investigation to identify risks so that controls can be introduced.

Investigation of even minor accidents and near misses will assist in identifying hazards and assessing risks that need to be controlled in your workplace. The format for such accident reports is a matter of choice, but the details listed above serve as a guide. Further information can also be found in AS1885. 1 – National Sstandard for Workplace Injury and Disease Recording. Where to report Notifiable accidents must be reported to the nearest NT WorkSafe office. Safety Management – a guide… age 27 Appendix C Resources Relevant Australian Standards An occupational health and safety management system (OHSMS) should be compatible with or integral to other management systems. The following standards and audit tools are essential resources that will assist workplaces in implementing these management systems. AS/NZS 4801 Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems – Specification with guidance for use The objective of this standard is to set auditable criteria for an OHSMS.

It is intended to provide organisations with the elements of an effective system that can be integrated with other management systems. AS/NZS 4804 Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems – General guidelines on principles, systems and supporting techniques The guidelines describe a systematic management approach that can assist you in meeting your legal requirements and lead to sustained improvement in occupational health and safety performance in your organisation. It is characterised by its approach to the process of hazard identification. AS/NZS 4360 Risk

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